Theages, a Pythagorean

Kabbalah, Sufism, Gnosticism and other forms of mysticism rooted in Christianity, Judaism, Islam
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Nicholas
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Theages, a Pythagorean

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From his On the Virtues:
The principles of all virtue are three: knowledge, power and deliberate
choice. Knowledge indeed is that by which we contemplate and
form a judgment of things; power is a certain strength of nature from
which we derive our subsistence, and which gives stability to our
actions; and deliberate choice is, as it were, the hand of the soul by
which we are impelled to, and lay hold on, the objects of our choice.

The soul is divided into reasoning power, anger and desire.
Reasoning power rules knowledge, anger deals with impulse, and
desire bravely rules the soul’s affections. When these three parts
unite into one action, exhibiting a composite energy, then concord
and virtue result in the soul. When sedition divides them, then discord
and vice appear.

When the reasoning power prevails over the irrational part of
the soul, then endurance and continence are produced; endurance
indeed in the retention of pains, but continence in the absence of pleasures.

But when the irrational parts of the soul prevail over the
reasoning part of the soul, then are produced effeminacy in flying
from pain, and incontinence in being vanquished by the pleasures.

When however the better part of the soul prevails, the less excellent
part is governed; the former leads, and the latter follows, and both
consent and agree, and then in the whole soul is generated virtue and all the goods.
Thomas Taylor translation.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Theages, a Pythagorean

Post by Nicholas »

Again, when the appetitive part of the soul follows
the reasoning, then is produced temperance; when this is the
case with the irascible, courage appears; and when it takes place in
all the parts of the soul, then the result is justice. Justice is that
which separates all the vices and all the virtues of the soul from each
other. Justice is an established order and organization of the parts
of the soul, and the perfect and supreme virtue; in this every good
is contained, while the other goods of the soul cannot subsist without it.

Hence Justice possesses great influence both among Gods
and men. It contains the bond by which the whole and the universe
are held together, and also that by which the Gods and men are connected
(cf. Plato, Gorgias 507e).

Among the celestials it is called Themis, and
among the terrestrials it is called Dike,
while among men it is called the Law.
These are but symbols indicative that justice is the supreme virtue.

Virtue, therefore, when it consists in contemplating and judging, is called wisdom;
when in sustaining dreadful things, is called courage;
when in restraining pleasure, it is called temperance;
and when in abstaining from injuring our neighbors, justice.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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Nicholas
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Re: Theages, a Pythagorean

Post by Nicholas »

Obedience to virtue according to, and transgression thereof
contrary to right reason, tends toward decorousness, and its opposite.
Propriety is that which ought to be. This requires neither addition
nor detraction, being what it should be. The improper is of two
kinds: excess and defect. The excess is over-scrupulousness, and its
deficiency, laxity. Virtue however is a habit of propriety. Hence it is
both a climax and a medium of which are proper things. They are
media because they fall between excess and deficiency; they are climaxes
because they endure neither increase nor decrease, being
just what they ought to be.
Dhamma is against the stream of common thought, deep, subtle, difficult, delicate, unseen by passion’s slaves cloaked in the murk of ignorance. Vipassī Buddha
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