Ten Grounds Sutra

the way of great Compassion
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Nicholas
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Ten Grounds Sutra

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Quotes from the new Kalavinka Press edition of Kumarajiva's translation from the Sanskrit:
He [a bodhisattva] then thinks in this manner:

These beings have fallen into wrong views, pursue the course
of wrong thinking, and travel wrong and dangerous paths. In
this, they are extremely pitiable. We [bodhisattvas] should cause
these beings to instead abide in the path of right views and in dharmas
that accord with reality.
They are always embroiled in mutual hatred and disputation.
They distinguish between others and themselves. We
should cause these beings to abide in the unsurpassable great kindness.
These beings are insatiable, always covet the wealth
and possessions of others, and constantly sustain themselves
through wrong livelihoods. We should cause these beings to
abide in pure actions of body, speech, and mind.
These beings pursue the causes and conditions of desire,
hatred, and delusion. They are always burned by the great blazing
fire of the many different sorts of afflictions and never seek
to acquire the means to escape. We should cause these beings
to extinguish the great flames of the afflictions and become
securely established in the station of clarity and coolness.
These beings are always covered over by the darkness of
ignorance. They have entered the great darkness and have left
behind the light of wisdom. Having entered the greatly hazardous
path of saṃsāra, they follow all different sorts of wrong
views. We should cause these beings to acquire the unimpeded
purified wisdom eye. Using this eye, they can know all dharmas
in accordance with their true character so that, without needing
to rely on others’ instruction, they can acquire the unimpeded
knowledge of all things in accordance with reality
Page 76
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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Here is the beginning of the Introduction by Bhikshu Dharmamitra:
As a continuation of my efforts to bring forth translations of important
bodhisattva path texts from the golden age of Classic Indian
and Chinese Mahāyana Buddhism, I present here my English translation
of The Ten Grounds Sutra (Daśabhūmika-sūtra) as translated into
Chinese from Sanskrit in the early 5th century by Tripiṭaka Master
Kumārajīva with the assistance of Tripiṭaka Master Buddhayaśas.
The subject of this scripture is the bodhisattva’s progress through
ten “grounds,” “planes,” or “levels” of spiritual path cultivation as
he ascends from his initial state as a common person ensconced in
cyclic existence up to that of a fully enlightened buddha who has
reached the utmost, right, and perfect enlightenment.

There is no agreement on the actual origin of this Ten Grounds
Sutra
text. According to the tradition, it was originally the “Ten
Grounds” chapter of the immense Avataṃsaka Sutra, but later circulated
independently as The Ten Grounds Sutra. A number of academics
prefer to think that it was first an independently circulating
scripture which was only later included in the Avataṃsaka Sutra. In
any case, in addition to the later Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Mongolian
editions of this text, there are six relatively early surviving Chinese
editions as follows:
Dharmarakṣa (c. 297), T 283;
Kumārajīva assisted by Buddhayaśas (c. 408–412 ce),1 T 286;
Buddhabhadra (c. 418–20 ce), as Avataṃsaka Sutra Ch. 22, T 278;
Bodhiruci (c. 508–511 ce), embedded in Vasubhandu’s commentary, T 1522;
Śikṣānanda (c. 695–699 ce), as Avataṃsaka Sutra Ch. 26, T 279;
Śīladharma (c. 790 ce), T 287.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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Bhikshu Dharmamitra's poetic and astute translation of the Ten Grounds Sutra opens the door for English speakers to enter the inspiring and compassionate world of bodhisattvas, the extraordinary beings who will become buddhas. In today's world, people so often succumb to despair and discouragement, but when we read the deeds of the bodhisattvas who train their minds and hearts in wisdom and compassion, our hearts soar with inspiration and optimism. We too have the buddha potential and can contribute to the welfare of others as they do. This very readable translations enables us to contact an ancient text that holds modern truths. It's a must read for all spiritual seekers. -- Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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The bodhisattva develops the gentle mind,
the harmonious mind, the capable mind,
the mind imbued with goodness, the serene mind, the genuine mind, the unmixed mind,
the unattached mind, the happy mind, and the magnanimous mind.
Once he has acquired these ten kinds of minds, he succeeds in entering the second ground.

The bodhisattva dwelling on this ground perfects all of the meritorious qualities,
always abandons the killing of beings,
and does not inflict distress on any of them.
He always abandons stealing,
does not produce thoughts inclined toward sexual misconduct, practices truthful speech, refrains from divisive speech,
and does not engage in harsh speech or frivolous speech.
With regard to the possessions of others,
he has no covetous thoughts,
does not visit anguish on any being,
and, employing the straight mind, courses in right views.

He has no arrogant thoughts
nor does he indulge flattering or devious thought.
He is pliant-minded and refrains from neglectfulness,
while protecting and upholding the Dharma of the Buddhas.

Realizing that all those severe sufferings and torments endured in the hell realms, in the animal realms,
and by the hungry ghosts in their flaming bodies
all come into existence due to evil thought,
He thinks, “I have now already eternally abandoned
all such circumstances associated with practicing what is evil.

Practice in accordance with genuine principles,
the good dharmas associated with quiescence,
and all circumstances in which one may experience happiness, from the human realm on up to the peak of existence,
including the bliss found in dhyāna and in the Three Vehicles —
This all arises through practicing the ten good karmic deeds."
Part of Vajragarbha Bodhisattva's summary of Second Ground.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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Of course Cleary's translation of this sutra, or chapter 26 in the Avatamsaka Sutra has been around for many years. He also has useful summary of the ten stages of the bodhisattva path to buddhahood. Here he is on the First Ground:
This text is thought by some to be perhaps the oldest section of the
scripture and may in some sense be considered its core; historically
speaking, it is a very important book in both Indian and Chinese
traditions. The ten stages of bodhisattvahood, with some of their
highlights, are as follows:

1 Extremely joyful: bodhisattvas are joyful because of recollection
of Buddhas, of Buddhas' teachings, of bodhisattvas, of bodhisattvas'
practices, of the pure ways of transcendence, of the excellence
of the stages of bodhisattvahood, of the incorruptibility of
bodhisattvas' powers, of the edification of living beings by Buddhas,
of the knowledge and power of all enlightened ones.
Bodhisattvas are also joyful at being able to help and benefit living beings,
and they feel joyful too on reflection that they are increasingly detached
from all mundane objects and realms, that they are approaching
Buddhahood, that they are leaving the state of ordinary people, that
they are approaching the state of wisdom, that they have forever
cut off evil tendencies, that they are born in the realm of Buddhas,
that they have entered the equal nature of all bodhisattvas, that
they are a reliance for living beings, that they can see all the
enlightened ones, that they are freed from fear.
Dominant in this stage is the practice of generosity.
From Cleary's Entry Into the Inconceivable:
An Introduction to Hua-yen Buddhism
, pp 192-3
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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Now the 84000 translation project has a new version from the Tibetan. Go to their Reading Room to read or download the Ten Bhumis sutra:

https://84000.co/

Here is the summary of the translation by Peter Alan Roberts:
After his attainment of buddhahood, the Buddha Śākyamuni is present in
many locations simultaneously. The Ten Bhūmis takes place two weeks after
his enlightenment, while he is sitting silently in meditation in the central
palace in the highest paradise of the desire realm. Countless bodhisattvas
have assembled there. Through the power of the Buddha, the bodhisattva
Vajragarbha enters samādhi and is blessed by countless buddhas, also
named Vajragarbha, to give a Dharma teaching to the bodhisattvas. In
response to the questions of the bodhisattva Vimukticandra, Vajragarbha
describes successively the ten bhūmis of a bodhisattva. Countless
bodhisattvas arrive and report that this same event is occurring
simultaneously in the highest paradises of all other worlds. The Buddha is
pleased by Vajragarbha’s teaching.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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From the 84000 new translation on the three good actions of body:
1. He does not kill: He forsakes clubs, forsakes swords, forsakes
revenge, feels shame, and is compassionate, and toward all living
beings he has a loving mind and wishes to bring them benefit and
happiness. He does not even have thoughts of harming beings, let alone of
consciously causing physical harm to other beings, knowing that they are beings.

2. He also does not take what is not given: He is content with his own
possessions and does not desire the possessions of others. He perceives that
things owned by others are the property of others and has a definite
understanding of what is theft. He will not take even a blade of grass or a
leaf that is not given, let alone that which sustains life.

3. He also does not practice sexual misconduct: He is content with his
own wife and does not desire the wife of another. He does not even have
desire toward women who belong to others, toward the wives of others, or
toward those prohibited because of family, signs, or Dharma, let alone
have sexual intercourse with them.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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There are four good actions of speech, here are the first two:
4. He also does not lie: He speaks the truth, says what has occurred,
speaks at the right time, speaks the right amount, and does what he says he
will do. He does not even tell a lie in his dreams, let alone tell a lie deliberately.

5. He also does not slander: He does not cause division and vexation
between people and he does not repeat to one person what he has heard
from another, nor does he then repeat what that person tells him back to the
other. He does not drive apart those who are in harmony. He does not
increase conflict. He does not enjoy disharmony and does not delight in
disharmony. He does not speak words that will create disharmony whether
they are true or not.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

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6. He also does not speak harsh words: His speech is not disturbing,
abusive, rough, hurtful, wounding, criticizing, accusing, low, vile,
worthless, unpleasant, filled with anger or rage, a cause for heartache,
disagreeable, or destructive to his own mind and the minds of others. He
speaks words that are gentle, agreeable, pleasant, delightful, favorable,
charming, respectable, valuable, clear, comprehensible, worth hearing,
dependable, pleasing to many, agreeable to many people, and praised by the
wise, and words that bring benefit and happiness to all beings, make the
mind happy, bring the mind satisfaction, calm his own and others’ minds,
and eliminate desire, anger, ignorance, and all kleśas.

7. He has also forsaken idle talk: He gives answers well, speaks at the
appropriate time, speaks truthfully, speaks meaningfully, speaks of the
Dharma, speaks logically, speaks with control, speaks with cause, and pays
attention to the time. He even avoids telling stories that should not be told,
let alone distracting speech.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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Re: Ten Grounds Sutra

Post by Nicholas »

The last three of the ten deal with the mind:
8. He is also not covetous: He does not covet the wealth of others, the
pleasures of others, the utensils of others, or the property of others. He does
not wish for, hope for, or desire them, thinking, ‘May what is theirs be mine.’

9. He also has no malice: Toward all beings his mind has love, altruism,
kindness, happiness, gentleness, the wish to benefit the entire world, and
the wish to compassionately benefit all beings. He is without anger, enmity,
the stain of hardheartedness, malevolence, rage, and so on. His
contemplations are contemplations and examinations that are beneficial,
loving, and bring benefit and happiness to beings.

10. He has the true view: He follows the correct path, which is marvelous,
fortunate, and free of bad views. He has correct views, is without deception,
is without duplicity, and has certainty in the Buddha, Dharma, and Saṅgha.

He always continuously maintains this path of the ten good actions.
A true mind and true intent bring truth within truth. True practice and true cultivation take the truth beyond truth. True behavior and true conduct add truth to truth. In everything and every way, be true, true, true. Master Hua
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